Fashion Your Future

By The Entrepreneurship Club at the Fashion Institute of Technology

Radio Enso Speaks With Entrepreneur Tara Gentile on How to be a Thriving Artist-Entrepreneur

About Tara: “I’m Tara Gentile and I’m on a quest to redefine commerce as the creation and distribution of meaning, relationship, and experience. And I’m more-than-okay making money doing it. I am in business to change business.
 
Business should reflect what we value in life. What we treasure and hold most dear. I am challenging the assumptions we hold around work/life balance, the starving artist mythos, and true personal success to create a new paradigm for the 21st century & beyond.
 
We’re living & working in a new age. Fewer boundaries. More meaning. Unprecedented access.
 
• How do we use this extraordinary period of history to make the world and its economic engines what we want them to be?
 
• How do we determine our own wealth?
 
My work: I work with passion-driven entrepreneurs to actualize their ideas, visions, and dreams – turning them into dollars and cents. I bring creative planning to branding, product development, and marketing that incorporates both strategy and high-touch design. Through collaborative coaching, my clients and I work towards mutual success.”
 
For more about Tara, visithttp://www.taragentile.com/.
No one ever succeeded without building on a foundation of many mistakes! View high resolution

No one ever succeeded without building on a foundation of many mistakes!

School is back in session and so is the Entrepreneurship Club @ FIT!
The Entrepreneurs club purpose is to further educate both existing, and aspiring entrepreneurs. The entrepreneurship club will stand as a learning hub for students who wish to learn more about entrepreneurship and what role it may play in their lives.
We invite not only FIT students but all students across New York to join us in creating something unique where like minded students can come together.
Contact Henry Welt at Henry_Welt@fitnyc.edu for more information
or visit facebook.com/FashionYourFutureFIT

School is back in session and so is the Entrepreneurship Club @ FIT!

The Entrepreneurs club purpose is to further educate both existing, and aspiring entrepreneurs. The entrepreneurship club will stand as a learning hub for students who wish to learn more about entrepreneurship and what role it may play in their lives.

We invite not only FIT students but all students across New York to join us in creating something unique where like minded students can come together.

Contact Henry Welt at Henry_Welt@fitnyc.edu for more information

or visit facebook.com/FashionYourFutureFIT

I realized why I need to start a new company. Not for the money. Not because I’m ‘bored’. But because a company is a laboratory to try your ideas.

20 Way to Find Your Calling

1. Ignore the future, deal with the present. 

2. Shop around. 

3. Say yes to odd opportunities.

4. Find a problem to solve.

6. Do not follow someone else’s dream.

7. Blend your talents.

8. Seek out people you actually like.

9. Give yourself permission to change your mind.

10. Ask the elderly for advice.


There’s 10 more where that came from

Why Better Products Don’t Always Win
May 15, 2013 By Karl Stark and Bill Stewart
You may have superior technology or a great feature set, but if your product doesn’t create value for the customer, its chance of success is slim.
What’s the lesson for entrepreneurs here?
Entrepreneurs building a new business often falsely assume that their novel product will succeed based on its great new feature set or superior technology. While the next great technology may in fact sell regardless of the competition, few products are so lucky. In most cases we need to shed our rose-colored glasses and instead focus on building what the customer wants.
How can an entrepreneur build a great business around an average product?
Only build the features that customers want and are willing to buy.
Make your product’s value proposition a clear comparison to the market alternatives, and work to lower barriers to acceptance.
Build a complete business model, including sales channels and distribution partners that allow you to deliver on the value you aim to create.
Understand the underlying economics of your business model, and build them to scale up as your business grows.
Build an investment plan that will fund your business growth and allow you to drive customer awareness, trial and adoption.
View high resolution

Why Better Products Don’t Always Win

May 15, 2013 By

You may have superior technology or a great feature set, but if your product doesn’t create value for the customer, its chance of success is slim.

What’s the lesson for entrepreneurs here?

Entrepreneurs building a new business often falsely assume that their novel product will succeed based on its great new feature set or superior technology. While the next great technology may in fact sell regardless of the competition, few products are so lucky. In most cases we need to shed our rose-colored glasses and instead focus on building what the customer wants.

How can an entrepreneur build a great business around an average product?

  1. Only build the features that customers want and are willing to buy.
  2. Make your product’s value proposition a clear comparison to the market alternatives, and work to lower barriers to acceptance.
  3. Build a complete business model, including sales channels and distribution partners that allow you to deliver on the value you aim to create.
  4. Understand the underlying economics of your business model, and build them to scale up as your business grows.
  5. Build an investment plan that will fund your business growth and allow you to drive customer awareness, trial and adoption.
You Don’t Have to Be a Product Visionary to Create a Great Product
According to Eric Ries, author of The Lean Startup, most start-ups fail because they built something that nobody wanted.
Check out how Lean Startup Machine is helping entrepreneurs test the riskiest assumptions about their businesses with their Lean process!
Click here for the Huffington Post article!

You Don’t Have to Be a Product Visionary to Create a Great Product


According to Eric Ries, author of The Lean Startup, most start-ups fail because they built something that nobody wanted.

Check out how Lean Startup Machine is helping entrepreneurs test the riskiest assumptions about their businesses with their Lean process!

Click here for the Huffington Post article!

Recession Proof Your Small Business


Great advice from fashion power couple, Elizabeth & David Klein of Beyond Vintage, on how finding a void in the market can create a strong small business

They Don’t Want Your Product! 
(Customers Want the Benefits of Your Product)
Creating and developing a lucrative brand via an online-only presence, with Airtasker’s CEO and Co-Founder of Joe Button, Tim Fung.
Why focus on brand creation?
Brands create an additional point of difference.  If people want your brand, they will pay higher prices (higher margins) and tend to be more ‘sticky’.
Internet shopping is becoming more experiential, so buyers don’t always buy product on a rationale basis but rather an emotive brand benefit.
Brands create loyalty, but price deals don’t. Incentives and discounts tend to create spikes, but you may have to keep re-acquiring customers.
How can an internet-only e-commerce business create a brand?
Use social media to create an online personality – cool social apps like Pinterest and Instagram provide a great platform to express your brand through images, video and social interaction.  Leverage this content on ubiquitous channels like Facebook and Twitter.
Use every brand touch point as an opportunity to express your brand – whether it’s your confirmation email template design, delivery packaging or product swing tags, think about every instance that your customer interacts with you and make sure that it’s part of a branded experience. Tangible touch points are critical.
Design your customer experience around an emotive brand benefit, not just a logic flow – at Joe Button, we don’t offer 10,000 fabrics, we curate our product down to just 30 fabrics per season to ensure that every shirt fits our brand.  We also name the shirts in our Sartorial Collection based on aspirational characters that inspired their design (like Don Draper or Patrick Bateman) to express our brand character and engage the customer with the emotive benefits of buying our products.
 
Read More on PowerRetail.com!

They Don’t Want Your Product!

(Customers Want the Benefits of Your Product)

Creating and developing a lucrative brand via an online-only presence, with Airtasker’s CEO and Co-Founder of Joe Button, Tim Fung.

Why focus on brand creation?

  • Brands create an additional point of difference.  If people want your brand, they will pay higher prices (higher margins) and tend to be more ‘sticky’.
  • Internet shopping is becoming more experiential, so buyers don’t always buy product on a rationale basis but rather an emotive brand benefit.
  • Brands create loyalty, but price deals don’t. Incentives and discounts tend to create spikes, but you may have to keep re-acquiring customers.

How can an internet-only e-commerce business create a brand?

  • Use social media to create an online personality – cool social apps like Pinterest and Instagram provide a great platform to express your brand through images, video and social interaction.  Leverage this content on ubiquitous channels like Facebook and Twitter.
  • Use every brand touch point as an opportunity to express your brand – whether it’s your confirmation email template design, delivery packaging or product swing tags, think about every instance that your customer interacts with you and make sure that it’s part of a branded experience. Tangible touch points are critical.
  • Design your customer experience around an emotive brand benefit, not just a logic flow – at Joe Button, we don’t offer 10,000 fabrics, we curate our product down to just 30 fabrics per season to ensure that every shirt fits our brand.  We also name the shirts in our Sartorial Collection based on aspirational characters that inspired their design (like Don Draper or Patrick Bateman) to express our brand character and engage the customer with the emotive benefits of buying our products.

 

Read More on PowerRetail.com!

Ladies, do you enjoy vintage inspired pieces? Do you like to stand out in the crowd? If your answer is yes, check this out! 

TODAY: Beyond Vintage is having a sample sale located 275 West 39th St (8th Avenue) on the 2nd floor.

The price ranges from $40-$90 and FIT students get an extra 15% off their purchases with valid ID. 

Don’t miss it! The sale runs May 17th and 18th, May 21st -24th !!

Our own Ebony Bolt went to the showroom to get a sneak peak of the sale check out the photos!

We had so much fun, mingling, nibbling on hors d’oeuvres and sipping on sparking cider when The Entrepreneurship Club visited the ‘Prohibition of Couture’ event at FIT - a design exhibition and contest hosted by the Fashion Design Club.
 
At the show we met designer Emily DelValle, a student at FIT, studying Childrenswear Design, and a fellow entrepreneur who is owner of the darling, vintage-inspired childrenswear line, Dapper & Delicate.
 
The Dapper & Delicate collection consists of chilrenswear and accessories, which Emily hand-makes with vintage and NYC garment district fabrics and notions.
 
Dapper & Delicate seasonal groups and custom made garments will become available for purchase on Etsy.com next month!
 
We are finding more and more that many designers have entrepreneurial aspirations, wanting to run their own lines with creative freedom! If you happen to be a designer who’d like to learn more about what it takes to startup your own line, or if you’d like to network with some fellow FIT students for possible collaborations, stop by The Entrepreneurship Club on Thursday, April 26th @ 1 PM in Room C705 to find out more! :)

Ultralite Powered by Tumblr | Designed by:Doinwork